Online Analytics Firm Settles Suit Over Unstoppable User Tracking

A screenshot of a “cookie” hidden in the browser cache. <img class=”aligncenter size-large wp-image-38776″ title=”browser-cache-cookie” src=”http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/business/2011/07/browser-cache-cookie-660×654.gif” alt=”” width=”660″ height=”654″ />KISSmetrics, a popular tool for websites to monitor who is using their site, has agreed to settle a lawsuit accusing the company of using shady techniques to recreate cookies after users deleted them and track users who blocked cookies. The company was sued in August 2011, just after Wired.com reported on research into the company’s practices by UC Berkeley researchers including Ashkan Soltani. The suit, brought on behalf of John Kim and Dan Schutzman, accused the company of violating California and federal anti-hacking laws and misappropriating their personal information for profit. In the proposed settlement (.pdf), the two plaintiffs will split $5,000, while their lawyers will get 100 times as much: more than $500,000 in legal fees for work ranging in rates from $350 to $580 per hour. Though the original lawsuit included KISSmetrics clients, such as Spotify and AOL, these companies were dismissed from the suit in the spring. There’s no payout for the general public.

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Online Analytics Firm Settles Suit Over Unstoppable User Tracking

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Monday, October 22nd, 2012 Net News

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